The future of society and the dangers ahead in the novel brave new world by aldous huxley

All the fetal conditioning, hypnopaedic training, and the power of convention molds each individual into an interchangeable part in the society, valuable only for the purpose of making the whole run smoothly. In such a world, uniqueness is uselessness and uniformity is bliss, because social stability is everything.

The future of society and the dangers ahead in the novel brave new world by aldous huxley

Everyone else has been conditioned from the time they were embryos to accept unquestioningly all the values and beliefs of the carefully ordered society.

The future of society and the dangers ahead in the novel brave new world by aldous huxley

Upper-class Alphas are allowed a little freedom because their higher intellect makes it harder for them to completely accept the rules of society. For example, they are occasionally allowed to travel to the Indian reservation to see how outsiders live.

Society and the Individual in Brave New World

Therefore, dissidents who want these freedoms are exiled to remote corners of the earth. He sees the people as enslaved, addicted to drugs, and weakened and dehumanized by their inability to handle delayed gratification or pain of any sort.

He exercises his freedom of choice by killing himself rather than becoming a part of such a world. The Controllers have decided there should be five social classes, from the superior, highly intelligent, and physically attractive Alphas—who have the most desirable and intellectually demanding jobs—to the inferior, mentally deficient, and physically unattractive Epsilons, who do the least desirable, menial jobs.

Huxley makes the Alphas tall and fair and the Epsilons dark-skinned, reflecting the common prejudices at the time the novel was written.

Aldous Huxley and Brave New World

All people are genetically bred and conditioned from birth to be best adapted to the lives they will lead and to accept the class system wholeheartedly. Members of different classes not only look physically different but wear distinctive colors to make sure that no one can be mistaken for a member of a different group.

Here, Huxley points out the shallowness in our own society: Only John the Savage can see people as they really are because he has not been conditioned to accept unquestioningly the rigid class structure. Thus, when he sees a dark-skinned person of a lower caste, he is reminded of Othello, a Shakespearean character who was both The entire section is 1, words.Introduction Written in and published the following year, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is a dystopian—or anti-utopian—novel.

In it, the author questions the values of London, using satire and irony to portray a. Brave New World By Aldous Huxley Words | 7 Pages. Giles 1 Attie Giles Lorna Martin AP English August 24, Brave New World Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a very graphic novel that exemplifies the problems of modern society with a fictional setting that dates far into the future.

Description. Aldous Huxley’s novel Brave New World was published in by Chatto & ashio-midori.com Holland designed this cover for the first edition.

Society and the Individual in Brave New World

Huxley’s dystopian novel describes a future society in which technological and medical innovations are used by the state to exercise control over its citizens. Jul 04,  · The novel Brave New World that was written in , we can see that some of huxley´s predictions are becoming real and consider his novel as a warn of dangers of giving the state the enough power over potent and new technology or a view of our future society if we continue behaving the we behave in the present.

Jan 19,  · Aldous Huxley chose Brave New World after reading William Shakespeare's play The Tempest. In Act 5 Scene 1 Miranda, daughter of the exiled magician Prospero, says: O wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here!

The future of society and the dangers ahead in the novel brave new world by aldous huxley

How beauteous mankind is! Reviews: 9. Aldous Huxley's A Brave New World The New World, a man-made Utopia, governed by its motto, Community, Identity, Stability (Huxley 3).

A man-made world in every way. Human beings fertilized in bottles.

Brave New World - Wikipedia