An analysis of the topic of the brave new world characters by aldous huxley

It was written in and was presented to the world a year after. The book was quick to find popularity among the wide audience mainly due to including and resembling ideas of a better life shared within the community. Bear in mind, that early 30s in Britain were the home to Depression, when the economy looked more like a rollercoaster with a tendency to deteriorate and the unemployment rate was staggering.

An analysis of the topic of the brave new world characters by aldous huxley

Share via Email British writer Aldous Huxley - sits with a newspaper on his lap, s. One was George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, with its horrific vision of a brutal, mind-controlling totalitarian state - a book that gave us Big Brother and thoughtcrime and newspeak and the memory hole and the torture palace called the Ministry of Love and the discouraging spectacle of a boot grinding into the human face forever.

The other was Aldous Huxley's Brave New Worldwhich proposed a different and softer form of totalitarianism - one of conformity achieved through engineered, bottle-grown babies and hypnotic persuasion rather than through brutality, of boundless consumption that keeps the wheels of production turning and of officially enforced promiscuity that does away with sexual frustration, of a pre-ordained caste system ranging from a highly intelligent managerial class to a subgroup of dim-witted serfs programmed to love their menial work, and of soma, a drug that confers instant bliss with no side effects.

Which template would win, we wondered. During the cold war, Nineteen Eighty-Four seemed to have the edge. But when the Berlin Wall fell inpundits proclaimed the end of history, shopping reigned triumphant, and there was already lots of quasi-soma percolating through society.

True, promiscuity had taken a hit from Aids, but on balance we seemed to be in for a trivial, giggly, drug-enhanced spend-o-rama: Brave New World was winning the race.

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That picture changed, too, with the attack on New York's twin towers in Thoughtcrime and the boot grinding into the human face could not be got rid of so easily, after all. The Ministry of Love is back with us, it appears, though it's no longer limited to the lands behind the former iron curtain: On the other hand, Brave New World hasn't gone away.

Shopping malls stretch as far as the bulldozer can see. On the wilder fringes of the genetic engineering community, there are true believers prattling of the gene-rich and the gene-poor - Huxley's alphas and epsilons - and busily engaging in schemes for genetic enhancement and - to go one better than Brave New World - for immortality.

Would it be possible for both of these futures - the hard and the soft - to exist at the same time, in the same place?

And what would that be like? Surely it's time to look again at Brave New World and to examine its arguments for and against the totally planned society it describes, in which "everybody is happy now".

What sort of happiness is on offer, and what is the price we might pay to achieve it?

I first read Brave New World in the early s, when I was It made a deep impression on me, though I didn't fully understand some of what I was reading. It's a tribute to Huxley's writing skills that although I didn't know what knickers were, or camisoles - nor did I know that zippers, when they first appeared, had been denounced from pulpits as lures of the devil because they made clothes so easy to take off - I none the less had a vivid picture of "zippicamiknicks", that female undergarment with a single zipper down the front that could be shucked so easily: The rounded pinkness fell apart like a neatly divided apple.

A wriggle of the arms, a lifting first of the right foot, then the left: The girl shedding the zippicamiknicks is Lenina Crowne, a blue-eyed beauty both strangely innocent and alluringly voluptuous - or "pneumatic", as her many male admirers call her.

Lenina doesn't see why she shouldn't have sex with anyone she likes whenever the occasion offers, as to do so is merely polite behaviour and not to do so is selfish. Never were two sets of desiring genitalia so thoroughly at odds. And thereon hangs Huxley's tale.

Brave New World is either a perfect-world utopia or its nasty opposite, a dystopia, depending on your point of view: Sir Thomas More, in his own 16th-century Utopia, may have been punning: As a literary construct, Brave New World thus has a long list of literary ancestors.

Plato's Republic and the Bible's book of Revelations and the myth of Atlantis are the great-great-grandparents of the form; nearer in time are More's Utopia, and the land of the talking-horse, totally rational Houyhnhnms in Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels, and HG Wells's The Time Machine, in which the brainless, pretty "upper classes" play in the sunshine during the day, and the ugly "lower classes" run the underground machinery and emerge at night to eat the social butterflies.

In the 19th century - when improvements in sewage systems, medicine, communication technologies and transportation were opening new doors - many earnest utopias were thrown up by the prevailing mood of optimism, with William Morris's News from Nowhere and Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward foremost among them.

Insofar as they are critical of society as it presently exists, but nevertheless take a dim view of the prospects of the human race, utopias may verge on satire, as do Swift's and More's and Wells's; but insofar as they endorse the view that humanity is perfectible, or can at least be vastly improved, they will resemble idealising romances, as do Bellamy's and Morris's.

The first world war marked the end of the romantic-idealistic utopian dream in literature, just as several real-life utopian plans were about to be launched with disastrous effects. The Communist regime in Russia and the Nazi takeover of Germany both began as utopian visions.

But as had already been discovered in literary utopias, perfectibility breaks on the rock of dissent. What do you do with people who don't endorse your views or fit in with your plans?Brave New World by Aldous Huxley () influenced Orwell’s own futuristic novel, Huxley’s totalitarian state, which exists in London six hundred years in the future, is less grim than Orwell’s, but its inhabitants are as powerless and oppressed as the citizens of Oceania.

Brave New world is a fictional novel set in A.S. or A.F. (After Ford – as referred in the novel), written in by Aldous Huxley.

Important Quotes from Brave New World

It describes the development of mankind in fields of advanced physical and reproductive health as well as psychological improvements. Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World presents a portrait of a society which is superficially a perfect world.

At first inspection, it seems perfect in many ways: it is carefree, problem free and depression free.

An analysis of the topic of the brave new world characters by aldous huxley

All aspects of the population are controlled: number, social class, and intellectual ability are . Jul 11,  · Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a novel about a dystopian society, with many characters that are just like us.

While reading this book, I noticed that there are many different archetypes portrayed by some of the characters and many of them still apply to society today. Jan 19,  · Aldous Huxley takes the reader further into his Brave New World and gradually introduces us to the main characters who are going to carry the human side of the story.

In a glossy, efficient, illness free community, it's the Alpha Plus intellectuals who start to Reviews: 9. Brave New World is a dystopian novel written by Aldous Huxley. In Chapter 13, the relationship between Lenina and John the Savage reaches a climactic moment that reveals the culture clash between.

SparkNotes: Brave New World: Chapter 1